351 results for author: admin


RESURRECTION SUNDAY
AT AZUSA STREET REVIVAL IN LITTLE TOKYO

Azusa Street Revival came alive on Easter Sunday at the JACCC Isamu Noguchi Plaza. A multicultural congregation of Blacks, Asians, Hispanics, and Whites celebrated Pastor William Seymour, son of slaves, who founded a multicultural congregation at 312 Azusa Street on April 9, 1906. The historic location within the borders of Little Tokyo witnessed one of the greatest spiritual revivals in history and became the Cradle of the Worldwide Pentecostal Movement which has touched over 800 million worshippers today.Pastor Patrick Deitrick Haddon of the Hill City Worship Camp and Storyteller is a well-known gospel singer, songwriter, music producer and actor. ...

BE A PART OF THE MOVEMENT


AZUSAFEST 2019 & Prophetic Conference


Azusa Street Revival – 112th Anniversary – Sun. April 8, 2018

To RSVP email: info@azusarevivalthemusical.com For more information about Azusa Revival | THE MUSICAL please visit: azusarevivalthemusical.com

The Grapefruit Tree

The Grapefruit Tree On December 8, 2012 at the corner of Azusa Street and San Pedro Avenue, a ceremony to remember united the Japanese Americans, Azusa Street Pentecostals, Skid Row, and Native Americans communities.  The last remaining citrus tree from the old agricultural fields had passed away in 2006 at the ripe age of 125 years old due to an accident in the bustling downtown streets.  The tree was beloved by the local community, who still ate its fruit; and in the tree’s passing, the community came together.  To commemorate the tree that several communities cherished, a new tree was planted in its place through a planting ceremony. Inviting ...

Internment Camps and Repatriation

Internment Camps and Repatriation During the 1930s, tens of thousands, and possibly more than 400,000, Mexicans and Mexican-Americans were pressured — through raids and job denials — to leave the United States during the Depression after the stock market crashed in 1929. This deportation was enforced without due process. Officials staged well-publicized raids in public places. For example, on Feb. 26, 1931, immigration officials suddenly closed off La Placita, a square near Olvera Street and about 1.4 miles north of Azusa Street, and questioned the roughly 400 people there about their legal status. With time, Mexican-Americans were granted ...

Rev. William Seymour in Front of the Church

Rev. William Seymour in Front of the Church Biddy Mason was Los Angeles’s first philanthropist. Born a slave on a Mississippi plantation in 1818, Mason’s life was fraught with hardships, but her driven spirit led to gaining her freedom and relocating to Los Angeles in 1856. Within ten years of working as a midwife, Mason saved enough money to purchase property on Spring Street for $250, thereby becoming one of the first African-American women to own land in Los Angeles. Mason sold part of the property in 1884 for $1,500, and over the years, her wise business and real estate transactions enabled her to accumulate a fortune of almost $300,000. ...

Map of Early Los Angeles and Zanja Madre

Map of Early Los Angeles and Zanja Madre On the cusp of cityhood in 1849, the roads, plots of land, fences, the river and the Zanja Madre of El Pueblo de Los Angeles were inked into memory. The Zanja Madre, meaning Mother Ditch, was the first attempt to control the wild Los Angeles river. The settlers of El Pueblo de la Reina de Los Angeles created the open, earthen ditch within a month of settling the area to divert the river water to the center of town, on present-day Olvera Street. As the town attracted more settlers and developed more agricultural fields, the demand for water grew as faster than the Zanja Madre could provide. Brick and mortar ...

El Aliso del Viento

El Aliso del Viento El Aliso del Viento sprung from the tumultuous floodplain of the Los Angeles River as Christopher Columbus arrived in the Americas. This sycamore seedling flourished as the Chumash and Tongva peoples sought peace and guidance. When El Aliso del Viento’s canopy spanned over 200 feet wide, the Tongva people created the Yaanga village around this sacred refuge. In 1781, new settlers choose land next to the Yaanga village to establish El Pueblo de la Reina de Los Angeles, and when the Tongva relocated Yaanga village, the settlers turned to El Aliso del Viento for shade and as a landmark to their rapidly growing city. El Aliso del ...

Fact 4

Additional Resources Learn how you can invest in a permanent display that can carry the message of salvation and Pentecost to all who visit the wall. Information is available regarding this important project at: www.azusastreetmissionfoundation.com. For further reading on William Seymour, the Azusa Street Mission, and the Azusa Street Revival, see: Craig Borlaise, William Seymour: A Biography (Lake Mary, FL: Charisma House, 2006). Gastón Espinosa, William J. Seymour and the Origins of Global Pentecostalism: A Biography and Documentary History (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2014). Larry Martin, The Life and Ministry of William J. Seymour and ...