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Fact 3

Fact #3 Azusa Street is a Valuable Pentecostal and Charismatic Pilgrimage Site The Church historian, Henry Chadwick once remarked that, “Nothing is sadder than someone who has lost his memory; and the church which has lost its memory is in the same state of senility.” Pentecostals have not always been known for appreciating either history or tradition. Indeed, when the Azusa Street site was available for purchase in the 1930s, it was said to have been offered to the Assemblies of God. The response that was received was that they were “not interested in relics”. Today, after a century of existence, Pentecostals have begun to sense that there ...

Fact 2

Fact #2 Azusa Street is a Pentecostal Heritage Site Until relatively recently, we have not known much about the Azusa Street Mission or the revival that brought it into existence. Most of what we have known about the revival was written by Frank Bartleman. The title of his book, How Pentecost Came to Los Angeles, first published in 1925, leads people to believe that it is the story of the Azusa Street Mission and revival. Yet of the ten chapters found in this book, only one of them actually focuses on “Azusa Street”. There are brief comments about the Mission and the revival in two or three other chapters, but it really contains only a single ...

Fact 1

Fact #1 Azusa Street is a Los Angeles Historical Site In its “Millennium” issue, Life magazine described the beginnings of Pentecostalism in 1906 Los Angeles as No. 68 among its choice of the 100 most significant events to take place during the second millennium of Christianity. (1) What makes this movement so significant is that it currently has roughly 643,661,000 members, or 25% of all Christians worldwide. (2) This family of churches is second in size only to the Catholic Church. Yet most people, even in Los Angeles, know little if anything about it or its origins. Los Angeles has been linked to early expressions of Pentecostalism for ...

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Azusa Street Facts

Azusa Street Facts Azusa Street is a Los Angeles Historical Site Azusa Street is a Pentecostal Heritage Site Azusa Street is a Valuable Pentecostal and Charismatic Pilgrimage Site Additional Resources

Augmented reality

Augmented Reality Augmented Reality can transform the Wall into a virtual museum. Through the download of an app users will be able to point their smartphones at various images and icons on the wall giving them access to video, pictures, articles or other media about the Azusa Street Revival and other elements of the events and seasons depicted in the wall panels.

The Vision

“We have an opportunity to tell the whole and diverse story of Los Angeles, which is truly a city of multi-ethnic people.” Judy Baca

The Concept

The Concept The Wall Project will feature a series of interactive etchings and panel reliefs that will bring the Azusa Street Revival to life and set it within the larger context of the history and development of the Los Angeles area and Little Tokyo.

The Artist

The Artist The Wall Project is being developed by renowned muralist Judy Baca. Judy is an American Chicana artist, activist, and University of California, Los Angeles professor of Chicana/o Studies in the School of Social Sciences and a professor of World Arts and Cultures in the School of Art and Architecture. She is the co-founder and artistic director of the Venice, California-based Social and Public Art Resource Center (SPARC), a community arts center, and is best known as the director of the mural project that created one of the largest murals in the world, the Great Wall of Los Angeles.

The Project – Headline

Azusa Street is located in the Little Tokyo area of Downtown Los Angeles. The project vision is to utilize the existing wall that lies between the south side of Azusa Street and the Noguchi Plaza, part of the Japanese American Cultural and Community Center (JACCC), and create a monument. Etchings and panel reliefs will be used to transform the wall into a memorial that brings the Azusa Street Revival to life and sets it within the larger context of the history and development of the Los Angeles area and Little Tokyo.