The Grapefruit Tree

The Grapefruit Tree On December 8, 2012 at the corner of Azusa Street and San Pedro Avenue, a ceremony to remember united the Japanese Americans, Azusa Street Pentecostals, Skid Row, and Native Americans communities.  The last remaining citrus tree from the old agricultural fields had passed away in 2006 at the ripe age of 125 years old due to an accident in the bustling downtown streets.  The tree was beloved by the local community, who still ate its fruit; and in the tree’s passing, the community came together.  To commemorate the tree that several communities ...

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Internment Camps and Repatriation

Internment Camps and Repatriation During the 1930s, tens of thousands, and possibly more than 400,000, Mexicans and Mexican-Americans were pressured — through raids and job denials — to leave the United States during the Depression after the stock market crashed in 1929. This deportation was enforced without due process. Officials staged well-publicized raids in public places. For example, on Feb. 26, 1931, immigration officials suddenly closed off La Placita, a square near Olvera Street and about 1.4 miles north of Azusa Street, and questioned the roughly 400 people ...

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Rev. William Seymour in Front of the Church

Rev. William Seymour in Front of the Church Biddy Mason was Los Angeles’s first philanthropist. Born a slave on a Mississippi plantation in 1818, Mason’s life was fraught with hardships, but her driven spirit led to gaining her freedom and relocating to Los Angeles in 1856. Within ten years of working as a midwife, Mason saved enough money to purchase property on Spring Street for $250, thereby becoming one of the first African-American women to own land in Los Angeles. Mason sold part of the property in 1884 for $1,500, and over the years, her wise business and real ...

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