Map of Early Los Angeles and Zanja Madre

Map of Early Los Angeles and Zanja Madre On the cusp of cityhood in 1849, the roads, plots of land, fences, the river and the Zanja Madre of El Pueblo de Los Angeles were inked into memory. The Zanja Madre, meaning Mother Ditch, was the first attempt to control the wild Los Angeles river. The settlers of El Pueblo de la Reina de Los Angeles created the open, earthen ditch within a month of settling the area to divert the river water to the center of town, on present-day Olvera Street. As the town attracted more settlers and developed more agricultural fields, the demand ...

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El Aliso del Viento

El Aliso del Viento El Aliso del Viento sprung from the tumultuous floodplain of the Los Angeles River as Christopher Columbus arrived in the Americas. This sycamore seedling flourished as the Chumash and Tongva peoples sought peace and guidance. When El Aliso del Viento’s canopy spanned over 200 feet wide, the Tongva people created the Yaanga village around this sacred refuge. In 1781, new settlers choose land next to the Yaanga village to establish El Pueblo de la Reina de Los Angeles, and when the Tongva relocated Yaanga village, the settlers turned to El Aliso del ...

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Augmented reality

Augmented Reality Augmented Reality can transform the Wall into a virtual museum. Through the download of an app users will be able to point their smartphones at various images and icons on the wall giving them access to video, pictures, articles or other media about the Azusa Street Revival and other elements of the events and seasons depicted in the wall panels.

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The Vision

“We have an opportunity to tell the whole and diverse story of Los Angeles, which is truly a city of multi-ethnic people.” Judy Baca

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The Concept

The Concept The Wall Project will feature a series of interactive etchings and panel reliefs that will bring the Azusa Street Revival to life and set it within the larger context of the history and development of the Los Angeles area and Little Tokyo.

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The Artist

The Artist The Wall Project is being developed by renowned muralist Judy Baca. Judy is an American Chicana artist, activist, and University of California, Los Angeles professor of Chicana/o Studies in the School of Social Sciences and a professor of World Arts and Cultures in the School of Art and Architecture. She is the co-founder and artistic director of the Venice, California-based Social and Public Art Resource Center (SPARC), a community arts center, and is best known as the director of the mural project that created one of the largest murals in the world, the Great ...

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The Project – Headline

Azusa Street is located in the Little Tokyo area of Downtown Los Angeles. The project vision is to utilize the existing wall that lies between the south side of Azusa Street and the Noguchi Plaza, part of the Japanese American Cultural and Community Center (JACCC), and create a monument. Etchings and panel reliefs will be used to transform the wall into a memorial that brings the Azusa Street Revival to life and sets it within the larger context of the history and development of the Los Angeles area and Little Tokyo.

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